TICKS IN DOGS AND CATS

Are ticks insects?

One of the most feared and hated parasites to prey on our pets is the tick. This blood-sucking creature can carry disease and transmit dangerous infections to both pets and humans so it is in every pet owners interest to know and understand how to reduce the risk of bites.


The best tips to keep ticks away

The tick is an unpleasant parasite which feeds on the blood of mammals and is a carrier for serious diseases (in some areas). A member of the arachnid family, which also includes scorpions and spiders, ticks are most common during the spring and summer months. If you are a pet owner, there is no need to worry about ticks because there are many things that you can do to prevent your dog from getting bitten and becoming ill.


How often should you check for ticks during tick season?

Have you ever found ticks on your pets or yourself? If so, you aren't alone! Tick bites are a major concern for veterinarians and health care professionals throughout the United States (and throughout the world).


How not to remove a tick

The first time that you find a tick attached to your pet, or yourself, can be a frightening experience. These small parasites are members of the arachnid family and survive by feeding on the blood of their hosts. Although ticks will usually drop off by themselves when they have sucked a sufficient amount of blood, it is highly recommended that you remove them as soon as possible. The main reason for this is that ticks can spread serious diseases such as Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain Fever, which can effect both pets and humans...


Tick paralysis

More than 20 species of ticks across the US are reported to be able to inflict tick paralysis. It occurs mainly in dogs and humans (especially children), but only occasionally in cats, which seem to be relatively immune to the condition.


Canine Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

With some 900 humans and an even greater number of dogs infected in the US every year, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is the most-frequently reported rickettsial disease in the country.


Lyme disease in dogs and cats

Lyme Disease, caused by the spirochete bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi, was first identified in Lyme, Connecticut in 1975. It is spread by bites from the tick genus Ixodes which are infected with the spirochete bacteria.


Tick bite symptoms and diseases

Ticks can transmit a number of diseases to pets, including Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Tularemia, Babesiosis, Ehrlichiosis, Cytauxzoonosis and Hepatozoonosis.


Diseases spread by tick bites

Ticks transmit diseases to humans and animals through their feeding activities. They feed on blood and lymph depending on the stage of their life cycle, with larvae favoring lymph and nymphs and adults preferring blood. Tick mouthparts are specially designed to enable them to pierce the skin of the host and feed efficiently.


The Lone Star Tick

The Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma americanum) was once considered primarily a Southern pest, but its geographic range is increasing across the southern, Midwestern and eastern states. Populations are now common from central Texas northwards to Iowa, then across to the Atlantic coast.


The deer tick

The Deer Tick, also known as the Black-legged Tick and the Lyme Disease Tick (as well as Ixodes scapularis or Ixodes dammini), is widely distributed in the eastern and central US states.


Brown dog ticks

The Brown Dog Tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) occurs throughout continental North America and Hawaii. It is the only species of tick that infests both human dwellings and dog kennels. It appears to be a cold-intolerant parasite and is found only in temperate regions within kennels and homes.


The American Dog Tick

The American Dog Tick (Dermacentor variabilis) is found in the eastern US from Florida to southern New England, and from the Atlantic coast to the eastern sections of the plains states. It may also be found along the Pacific coast.

These ticks are commonly located in grassy meadows, in young growing forests and along weedy roadsides and trails.


Revolution flea and tick

Products used to prevent or control ticks include Frontline, Preventic collars, Permoxin Insecticidal Spray and Wash, Advantix and Revolution. Tick prevention should continue throughout the tick season, in conjunction with daily checking of the pet's skin for attached ticks.


Preventic tick collar

Products used to prevent or control ticks include Frontline, Preventic collars, Permoxin Insecticidal Spray and Wash, Advantix and Revolution. Tick prevention should continue throughout the tick season, in conjunction with daily checking of the pet's skin for attached ticks.


K9 Advantix for dogs

Advantix combines imidacloprid with permethrin. The combination has been reported to complement the flea and tick activity of each component to create a synergistic effect. This product boasts killing and repellent activity against ticks and fleas.


Frontline Plus for dogs

Products used to prevent or control ticks include Frontline, Preventic collars, Permoxin Insecticidal Spray and Wash, Advantix and Revolution. Tick prevention should continue throughout the tick season, in conjunction with daily checking of the pet's skin for attached ticks.


Tick prevention for dogs and cats

Ticks are most prevalent during the summer months. Avoiding tick habitats, such as forest and scrub, during this time of the year is advisable. Pets should be treated with tick prevention products and checked daily during the tick season. If seen, ticks should be removed immediately.


What are Ticks?

Ticks are blood-sucking parasites which feed on humans and domestic pets. Most ticks live in forest or scrub areas and cause problems during the summer months. Ticks can transmit a number of diseases, including Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, in their saliva when they bite a host.


Dog ticks and cat ticks

Ticks are blood sucking parasites which affect humans and pets. Most ticks live in forest or scrub areas and cause problems during the summer months.